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Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Uncontacted Tribe of Amazon


Skin painted bright red, heads partially shaved, arrows drawn back in the longbows and aimed square at the aircraft buzzing overhead. The gesture is unmistakable: Stay Away.

Behind the two men stands another figure, possibly a woman, her stance also seemingly defiant. Her skin painted dark, nearly black.

The apparent aggression shown by these people is quite understandable. For they are members of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes, who live in the Envira region in the thick rain-forest along the Brazilian-Peruvian frontier.

Thought never to have had any contact with the outside world, everything about these people is, and hopefully will remain, a mystery.

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Their extraordinary body paint, precisely what they eat (the anthropologists saw evidence of gardens from the air), how they construct their tent-like camp, their language, how their society operates - the life of these Amerindians remains a mystery.

'We did the overflight to show their houses, to show they are there, to show they exist,' said Brazilian uncontacted tribes expert José Carlos dos Reis Meirelles Junior. 'This is very important because there are some who doubt their existence.'

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Meirelles, who despite once being shot in the shoulder by an arrow fired by another tribe campaigns to protect these peoples, believes this group's numbers are increasing, and pointed out how strong and healthy the people seemed.

'These pictures are further evidence that uncontacted tribes really do exist. The world needs to wake up to this, and ensure that their territory is protected in accordance with international law. Otherwise, they will soon be made extinct.', said Miss Miriam Ross of Survival International, which campaigns to protect the world's remaining indigenous peoples.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Sunday, March 7, 2010

Unbelievable Sea Monster found


I for one hope this is just an illusion, or I wont be taking a dip in the sea so soon. However, original owner claims this is a real sea monster that was dumped by the sea on a near-bye beach. Discovery Channel also claimed that unbelievable sea creatures live in deep-sea, and that we aren’t aware of their existence.

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Saturday, March 6, 2010

Capsule Hotel - Japan

A capsule hotel is a type of hotel in Japan with a large number of extremely small "rooms" (capsules).

The guest space is reduced in size to a modular plastic or fiberglass block roughly 2 m by 1 m by 1.25 m, providing room to sleep. Facilities range in entertainment offerings (most include a television, an electronic console, and wireless internet connection). These capsules are stacked side by side and two units top to bottom, with steps providing access to the second level rooms. Luggage is stored in a locker, usually somewhere outside of the hotel. Privacy is ensured by a curtain or a fibreglass door at the open end of the capsule. Washrooms are communal and most hotels include restaurants (or at least vending machines), pools, and other entertainment facilities.

This style of hotel accommodation was developed in Japan and has not gained popularity outside of the country, although Western variants with larger accommodations and often private baths are being developed. Guests are asked not to smoke or eat in the capsules.

These capsule hotels vary widely in size, some having only fifty or so capsules and others over 700. Many are used primarily by men[2]. There are also capsule hotels with separate male and female sleeping quarters. Clothes and shoes are sometimes exchanged for a yukata and slippers on entry. A towel may also be provided. The benefit of these hotels is convenience and price, usually around ¥2000-4000 a night ($21-42, €16-31, £15-29).

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Each capsule has a little control panel.

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There is an alarm clock, TV/Radio speaker, light and TV on/off switch, volume knob, and some panic button. TV channels can also be changed through control panel.

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TV and Pay box. Pay box is for premium channels.

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A small screen or blinder that indicate outsiders not to disturb you.

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Occupants are asked not to eat and smoke inside the capsule.

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There are separate capsule sections for male and female occupants ensuring safety and better security .